Conservation Education

The Utah Municipal Power Agency-Energy Education program is a collaborative partnership between the Utah Municipal Power Agency and the National Energy Foundation (NEF). The program objective is to expand and promote energy awareness through an educational program and to obtain actual energy savings through student and educator household use of energy knowledge, activities, and reminders. The target audience is fifth-grade students and their teachers within the cities of Levan, Manti, Nephi, Provo, Salem, and Spanish Fork. This includes approximately 28 schools, 90 teachers, 2,400 students and their families.

The Program Includes Two Components:

The first is a fifth-grade energy assembly centered around energy basics, energy conservation and information on peak demand time.

The second is a school to the home component, where students take home a packet containing Energy Action Challenge and other items to help families participate and gain knowledge of the energy that they use.

The UMPA Home Energy Worksheet Survey is another important part of the education program. The survey asked parents about home electricity use, their utilization of peak demand magnets and Turn it Off Stickers that were given during the presentation and general questions regarding attitudes toward energy use.

The Program Includes Two Components:

The first is a fifth-grade energy assembly centered around energy basics, energy conservation and information on peak demand time.

The second is a school to the home component, where students take home a packet containing Energy Action Challenge and other items to help families participate and gain knowledge of the energy that they use.

The UMPA Home Energy Worksheet Survey is another important part of the education program. The survey asked parents about home electricity use, their utilization of peak demand magnets and Turn it Off Stickers that were given during the presentation and general questions regarding attitudes toward energy use.

Having the opportunity to watch some of the presentations and hearing comments from the students, teachers, and some parents have confirmed to me how successful this program is for UMPA. The students get excited about taking the Energy Action Challenge sheet home to see how much energy they use and how they can do better. One parent told me that their daughter is still telling them to turn the lights off five years later. Teachers have stated how much they like the program and they look forward to it each year. One teacher said that the students like it because the facts are related to them and they can apply the concepts being taught on a daily basis. For UMPA, it helps develop an awareness of what families can do today to reduce energy waste and develop a generation of individuals that will continue to be aware of our environment and how they use energy.

Bill Doty

UMPA Analyst

UMPA has supported the National Energy Foundation Program for approximately 15 years and will continue to do so due to the success of the program.
First, this program is taught annually to students in the 5th grade by their teachers; it is a part of their overall education. Second, these students are able to see the value it brings and are anxious to apply what they learned in their own homes. Most, if not all parents, appreciate to some extent the desire their children have to implement some of the conservation methods within their own homes. Third, by educating those young minds about the earth’s resources and how to be good stewards through common sense conservation methods, we are setting a pattern for future generations to follow.
From such little efforts of many can substantial and lasting results be achieved.

Scott Lynsky

UMPA Operations Manager

Conservation Tips

Water Usage

Add energy-efficient showerheads and faucet aerators to reduce the amount of water released by up to 50 percent.

When shaving or washing, fill the sink half-way instead of running the water. Turning on the faucet only when necessary can save thousands of gallons of water a year, not to mention the energy needed to heat it.

Run your dishwasher only when it is filled to capacity, but not overloaded. This will cut the costs of energy, water, and detergent.

Heat & Cooling

Thermostats should be set and then forgotten. The more you change the setting during the day, the more likely you are to waste energy. Install a programmable thermostat that will give you 4 settings a day.

Keeping the temperature a few degrees cooler can lower your heating bill and still keep you comfortable. During the day, keep the thermostat between 65ºF and 68ºF (18ºC to 20ºC).

As a rule, if you have less than three inches of existing insulation in the attic, you should probably add more. When purchasing insulation, check the R-value. The higher the number, the higher the insulating capability.

Cooking

Cook by time and temperature. Precise timing eliminates repeated opening of the oven door to check on cooking progress. Each time the door is opened, the temperature drops 25ºF to 50ºF.

It takes energy to heat water, so use as little as possible. Most frozen or fresh vegetables can be cooked in a quarter cup of water. Even eggs will cook in this reduced amount if the pan has a tight-fitting lid.

Set the temperature of your refrigerator between 37ºF and 40ºF and your freezer at 0ºF for top efficiency. The Food and Drug Administration also recommends these settings to prevent rapid bacterial growth.

Resources

Energy conservation is a benefit to you and your community. RenewChoice through its Conserve program offers resources and information to assist those in its member cities conserve energy.